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Kenmore  Refrigerator Waterline Installation Kit, Copper

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 Rating 3.5 | 12 Reviews | Write a review
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Specifications & Dimensions

Product Overview:
Accessory Type: Installation accessory
Kit or Set Type: Filter installation kit
Overall Type: Filter installation kit
Overall Dimensions: Tubing: 300; Union: 0.25 x 0.25 in.
Performance Features:
Treatment Method: Filtration

Overview

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Product Description

This copper refrigerator hose allows quick, easy connection of your refrigerator to your waterline. This  copper tubing is easy to install—just follow the simple step-by-step instructions.

Kit includes the following:

  • Two compression fittings
  • One 1/4" x 1/4 union
  • One 25’ copper tubing
  • One saddle valve

This product is:
  • Available for Gift Wrap

Added on June 29, 2010

 

Overall, others give this:

12 Reviews Write a review
9 Reviewers (75.0%) would recommend this to a friend.
Overall Rating Breakdown:
5stars
4stars
3stars
2stars
1stars

Reviewers may have received a benefit, like a sweepstakes entry or rewards program points, in exchange for writing a review.
Those benefits were not conditioned on the positive or negative content of the review.

Most Helpful Reviews

Praise8 found this helpful
Pr01
Sep 3 , 2008
Not too bad of a install.
Here is basically what I did and it worked out fairly well. Total time was about 15-20 minutes. I drilled a 5/8" hole down through the kitchen floor to the basement. I straightened out the copper coil to go down through the floor (BE CAREFUL, the copper kinks EASILY!) I ran down through the floor and routed it to a close cold water line. I turned off the main water supply to the house (shutoff valve coming in from the street). I then 'test' fit the 'clamp' assembly (the part with the valve) around the pipe to make sure I could get at the 2 screws to clamp it together and also get to the valve to turn it on/off. I then took a nail (it was actually a roofing nail, but anything should do) and made a modest but noticable dimple in the pipe (by hitting the nail with a hammer) where the oriface would enter the pipe (I did this becase it would have been VERY hard to drill into a round pipe without a dimple for the drill bit to ride in. The instructions say to use a hand drill, I didn't have one so I used my electric (this was my choice, BEWARE .. electric drills and running water do not mix). I first drilled a 1/8" hole. Water WILL come out even though you have the main shut off. I waited until it was down to a few drips per minute and then drilled the 1/4" hole. Drilling in 2 steps is much easier. I then assembled the 'clamp' valve around the pipe and lined up the 'nipple' that goes into the 1/4" hole that I drilled. Make SURE you have the black rubber washer over the nipple. I then started turning the clamping screws (EQUALLY) until I thought is was tight. Make sure the valve on the clamp in shut off (turn clockwise all the way), and turn on your main household water valve. It's best to have someone watch for leaks while you do this. No leaks, your done. If you have a major spray or steady stream, shut off main household water valve and tighten 2 clamp screws more, then re-test. If you have a slight drip, just start tightening the 2 clamp screws (1/2 turn EACH). Make sure the entire clamp looks even around the pipe. I had a slight leak (drip every second or two). I keep tightening each clamp screw (evenly) until it sealed. Next push the 'female' nut onto the copper coil water line, then the 'ferrel' (little copper piece) onto the copper coil. Push the end of the copper coil (with the ferrel on the end) into the 'male' (part with threads you can see) attachment of the clamp valve. Slide the 'female' nut down and screw onto the valve. I tightened to where the wrench started to get some resistance, the another 1/2 turn. Once the OTHER end is connected to your refrigerator (or whatever), open the clamp valve (counterclockwise) and check for leaks. I had some, have to tighten the 'female' nut another turn and a half. That was it. Not long, still don't leak (3 days). Hope this helps someone!
Criticism4 found this helpful
zoe123
Aug 26 , 2008
Not Easy to Install
My husband has installed the self tapping version and this one you have to drill a whole into the pipe! Needless to say, it didn't work and it leaked -- ended up getting a plumber in to install and shut-off valve, etc. and some $$ later, we finally had it. Note: the plumber said that he's never seen such a installation kit (it should be self tapping)!
 

Larry-in-Illinois

Poplar Grove, IL

Aug 11 , 2014
via sears.com
Overall
It does the job.

What else, it serves the purpose it was designed to do.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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buyamerican319

Lansdale, PA

Jun 25 , 2014
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Overall
cost to much

this kit is very expensive for what you get.it was like $42.00 and you dont even get a on and off valve. if you want that it will cost you extra. basicly i think its a rip off.if you need one i suggest you go elswhere to buy one.


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tracym.

Philadelphia, PA

May 4 , 2014
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Overall
No problems with this product

Did not realize that I needed this item. It works well!

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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DarrellNH

Wolfeboro, NH

Dec 14 , 2013
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Overall
Missing parts

The kit was missing the fittings for the refrigerator end of the tubing.


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XxHaimBondxX

Albany, NY

Nov 19 , 2013
via sears.com
Overall
Great product, not only for Kenmore brands

Our new fridge is Whirlpool, however, this worked perfectly fine. I couldn't find any kits longer than 20 feet that were not plastic. I'd have to buy a valve and coil separately, which would cost much more. This is 25 feet has a good flow, should last a century. Other reviewers don't understand the difference between this and the self piercing valves. Yes, it's much easier to pierce a pipe with a needle, however, unless you want your water/ice dispenser to produce drops of water, you have to drill an actual hole and use this type of a valve. The other thing to remember: be careful not to kink the line, don't pull on it, don't cause it to bend down and pinch, this will kill it. I left about 10 extra feet in round coil behind the fridge so I could pull it back and clean it.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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Jul 22 , 2013
via sears.com
Overall
water hook up kit

Worked perfect

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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teachmetoo

Mundelein, IL

Mar 27 , 2013
via sears.com
Overall
A few more parts and decent instructions

We ran this and used nylon clips to strap it to the wall. Used a T adaption for the under sink connection and more compression fittings. I researched a bit and decided to put a screw fitting on the frig end and connect a flexible connector. The soft copper can possibly bend shut when the refrigerator is pushed back. By connecting a flexible hose this will never happen. Especially for those that want to occasionally pull the frig out to clean behind.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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aliciajf

Philadelphia, PA

Dec 14 , 2012
via sears.com
Overall
Read before you purchase as an add-on

I purchased this as a recommended add-on with my refrigerator and was told that I needed it to have my water line installed by the delivery men. After waiting for a late delivery was told that my delivery man can't install this portion of the water line - that I would need to hire a plumber to install it. I wish I had known that I needed to hire a plumber before delivery so that the delivery person could just hook up the refrigerator during delivery to make sure that everything worked properly.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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snayson

Sparta, NJ

Sep 21 , 2011
via sears.com
Overall
one kit that does it all for a complete installation.

the Kenmore Refrigerator Waterline Installation Kit, with Copper  line has all the nessesary parts needed to do a complete hookup for your fridge.  no parts unting and no guess work.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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Pr01

, Pa

Sep 3 , 2008
via sears.com
Overall
Not too bad of a install.

Here is basically what I did and it worked out fairly well. Total time was about 15-20 minutes. I drilled a 5/8" hole down through the kitchen floor to the basement. I straightened out the copper coil to go down through the floor (BE CAREFUL, the copper kinks EASILY!) I ran down through the floor and routed it to a close cold water line. I turned off the main water supply to the house (shutoff valve coming in from the street). I then 'test' fit the 'clamp' assembly (the part with the valve) around the pipe to make sure I could get at the 2 screws to clamp it together and also get to the valve to turn it on/off. I then took a nail (it was actually a roofing nail, but anything should do) and made a modest but noticable dimple in the pipe (by hitting the nail with a hammer) where the oriface would enter the pipe (I did this becase it would have been VERY hard to drill into a round pipe without a dimple for the drill bit to ride in. The instructions say to use a hand drill, I didn't have one so I used my electric (this was my choice, BEWARE .. electric drills and running water do not mix). I first drilled a 1/8" hole. Water WILL come out even though you have the main shut off. I waited until it was down to a few drips per minute and then drilled the 1/4" hole. Drilling in 2 steps is much easier. I then assembled the 'clamp' valve around the pipe and lined up the 'nipple' that goes into the 1/4" hole that I drilled. Make SURE you have the black rubber washer over the nipple. I then started turning the clamping screws (EQUALLY) until I thought is was tight. Make sure the valve on the clamp in shut off (turn clockwise all the way), and turn on your main household water valve. It's best to have someone watch for leaks while you do this. No leaks, your done. If you have a major spray or steady stream, shut off main household water valve and tighten 2 clamp screws more, then re-test. If you have a slight drip, just start tightening the 2 clamp screws (1/2 turn EACH). Make sure the entire clamp looks even around the pipe. I had a slight leak (drip every second or two). I keep tightening each clamp screw (evenly) until it sealed. Next push the 'female' nut onto the copper coil water line, then the 'ferrel' (little copper piece) onto the copper coil. Push the end of the copper coil (with the ferrel on the end) into the 'male' (part with threads you can see) attachment of the clamp valve. Slide the 'female' nut down and screw onto the valve. I tightened to where the wrench started to get some resistance, the another 1/2 turn. Once the OTHER end is connected to your refrigerator (or whatever), open the clamp valve (counterclockwise) and check for leaks. I had some, have to tighten the 'female' nut another turn and a half. That was it. Not long, still don't leak (3 days). Hope this helps someone!

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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